Wednesday’s Weather and a bookish conundrum . . .

It’s more autumn than spring this morning in Te Kuiti, New Zealand with morning mist, drizzle, and it’s cold out there!

We are in the first day of Level 2 – Delta style today. 🤞

I was clearing my emails over my morning coffee, and there was one from a certain publisher who shall remain nameless, declining my request for an ARC because my feedback ratio is too low – 67%. Okay, I thought, fair enough. BUT it was for a book in a series of which I have read and reviewed all the earlier books.

The following email was from the same publisher, offering me a widget – for the same book 😂🤣😂🤣 Yes, I downloaded it very quickly before they changed their minds again.

Has anyone else had this happen?

Have a wonderful Wednesday!🥂

Wednesday in Wellington, New Zealand

Finally, here are some of the photos from our few days in Wellington last month. We travelled both ways by train which is an extremely relaxing way to travel. We didn’t get many photos on the way down as it rained quite heavily most of the way, but we were extremely lucky with the weather while we were there. It was raining again when we left Wellington, but cleared about an hour into our journey home.

This was the view from our hotel room balcony. We could see from Oriental Bay, to our right, the marina was immediately in front of us, and the port off to our left. So there was always something to watch as we sat on the balcony and and rested our weary feet in the late afternoon.

These are some of the lovely old homes that line Oriental Parade in Oriental Bay.

Situated on the hill above Oriental Bay, Saint Gerard’s Monastery and Church, built in 1932 and 1908 respectively, are considered a historic landmark. After 113 years, St Gerard’s Church held its final mass at the end of May. It closed over “safety concerns” but the fate of the buildings remains unclear.

The Wellington Cable Car is a funicular railway in Wellington, New Zealand, between Lambton Quay, the main shopping street, and Kelburn, a suburb in the hills overlooking the central city, rising 120 m (394 ft) over a length of 612 m (2,008 ft).

There are a number of viaducts spanning the rivers between Te Kuiti and Wellington. This photo was taken from one in the Manawatu.

New Zealand farmland.

Home to three active volcanic mountains, and iconic and majestic landscapes, Tongariro National Park has attracted adventurers of all ages since 1887. This is Mount Ruapehu.

The main reason for doing this train trip was to travel the Raurimu Spiral, which my grandfather worked on when he first came to Te Kuiti as a young man.

The only way of really appreciating the engineering excellence and sinuous beauty of the Raurimu spiral is to see it from the air. The spiral was devised by Department of Public Works engineer Robert Holmes in 1898. His design was a clever solution to a major problem – the land between between Raurimu and National Park dropped significantly and was too steep for a train to travel along directly. Holmes’s spiral increased the distance between these two locations to by employing sweeping curves and tunnels, which allowed the railway track to follow a manageable incline. It was constructed between 1905 and 1908. The Historic Places Trust registered the spiral as a category one historic place in 2005. (Te Ara, Govt. New Zealand)

My next mission is to view it from the air.

Thank you for sharing my journey.

Matariki

This post complements my previous post today on Maori sacred sites in New Zealand.

Matariki is a special occasion in the New Zealand calendar which marks the start of the Māori New Year. Signified by the Matariki cluster of stars reappearing in our night sky, this is a time of celebration and reflection.

Traditionally, Matariki was used to determine the coming season’s crop. A warmer season, and therefore a more productive crop yield, was indicated by how bright the stars were. Matariki provides an ideal opportunity to explore the ways that people pass on and sustain aspects of their culture and heritage.

It has just been announced that Matariki celebrations will be held at the beautiful Waitomo Caves, which is twenty minutes from where we live. Click on following link to learn more about our Matariki celebrations and see a photo of our beautiful and world famous caves.

https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/travel/2021/06/matariki-ki-waitomo-matariki-festival-to-be-held-in-waitomo-july-3-10.html

Waitomo is a village on the North Island of New Zealand. It’s known for its extensive underground cave systems. Thousands of glow-worms light up the Glowworm Caves. The vast Ruakuri Cave features waterfalls and limestone formations. West, Mangapohue Natural Bridge is a high limestone arch over Mangapohue Stream.

Image creditsCreator:SHAUN JEFFERSCopyright:SHAUN JEFFERS PHOTOGRAPHY

Mangapuhoe Natural Bridge

Five of the most sacred Maori sites in New Zealand (Aotearoa)

Because I haven’t had time to write a post today – I have been looking after my grandson who had finally succumbed to the stomach bug doing the rounds at daycare – I am going to share with you some more beautiful New Zealand scenery, accompanied by some Maori lore and legend. Just click on the link and enjoy.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/experiences/maori-culture/300324397/five-of-the-most-sacred-mori-sites-in-new-zealand

Tuesday Travels

Last year I posted when we drove to the small coastal settlement of Awakino for lunch, and spoke about it being the last time that I would pass through the Awakino tunnel. Although it is not a big tunnel, the children always loved the echo of the car horn as we passed through it.

I have attached a link to an article about the closure of the tunnel and the opening of the new bypass. There are some beautiful photos for those of you wanting some more New Zealand scenery.

https://www.stuff.co.nz/taranaki-daily-news/news/300315332/50m-awakino-tunnel-bypass-days-away-from-opening