Walk A Crooked Line by Susan McBride

Walk a Crooked Line by Susan McBride

EXCERPT: She should have been on her way to her first period class, learning Spanish or Algebra or whatever it was that fifteen year old sophomores studied these days. She should have been complaining about the cafeteria food, deciding whether she wanted to try out for the fall musical, dishing on the latest boy band, and forgetting the combination to her locker.

Not waiting for the van to take her to the county Morgue.

ABOUT THIS BOOK: A young girl has taken her own life. But what—or who—drove her to it?

When a teenager’s body is found at the base of the old water tower, Detective Jo Larsen is one of the first on the scene. Tragically, it appears to be a clear case of suicide.

But the more Jo learns about Kelly Amster, the more she finds herself needing to understand why the high school sophomore would take that fatal plunge. As they interview family and friends, Jo and her partner, Hank Phelps, begin to fit together the pieces of a dark puzzle. Something happened to Kelly in their small town of Plainfield, Texas—and it sent the young girl straight over the edge.

Haunted by the memories of her own childhood, Jo digs deep into the shadowy corners of a seemingly tight-knit community—to uncover a devastating secret…

MY THOUGHTS: Reading Walk A Crooked Line by Susan McBride is a bit like eating Weetbix. You know what you are getting, and there’s not much you can do to make it any tastier. There is really nothing remarkable or memorable about this read. It was a good middle of the road detective story, with perhaps a little too much introspection on the part of the (predictably damaged) lead female detective. Other than that, there is nothing wrong with the story but, it has all been done before and will, no doubt, be done again. So, Weetbix again tomorrow?

Thank you to Thomas and Mercer via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of Walk A Crooked Line by Susan McBride for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system.

This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2433664384

The Fifth to Die by J.D. Barker

The Fifth To Die by J.D. Barker

EXCERPT: Darkness.

It swirled around him deep and thick, eating the light and leaving nothing behind but an inky void. A fog choked his thoughts – the words tried to come together, tried to form a cohesive sentence, to find meaning, but the moment they seemed close, they were swallowed up and gone, replaced by a growing sense of dread, a feeling of heaviness – his body sinking into the murky depths of a long-forgotten body of water.

ABOUT THIS BOOK: In the thrilling sequel to The Fourth Monkey, a new serial killer stalks the streets of Chicago, while Detective Porter delves deeper into the dark past of the Four Monkey Killer.

Detective Porter and the team have been pulled from the hunt for Anson Bishop, the Four Monkey Killer, by the feds. When the body of a young girl is found beneath the frozen waters of Jackson Park Lagoon, she is quickly identified as Ella Reynolds, missing three weeks. But how did she get there? The lagoon froze months earlier. More baffling? She’s found wearing the clothes of another girl, missing less than two days. While the detectives of Chicago Metro try to make sense of the quickly developing case, Porter secretly continues his pursuit of 4MK, knowing the best way to find Bishop is to track down his mother. When the captain finds out about Porter’s activities, he’s suspended, leaving his partners Clair and Nash to continue the search for the new killer alone.

Obsessed with catching Bishop, Porter follows a single grainy photograph from Chicago to the streets of New Orleans and stumbles into a world darker than he could have possibly imagined, where he quickly realizes that the only place more frightening than the mind of a serial killer is the mind of the mother from which he came.

MY THOUGHTS: OMG! Intense! Mind-blowing! Bizarre! Addictive! Twisted and twisty. . . Never saw that coming. Full marks Mr Barker, you utterly sucker-punched me with that one.

I remember going to the movies as a child, a vastly different experience to what it is today, and before the main feature there would be a newsreel, a cartoon or two, and a serial. The sort where, at the end, the girl is tied to the railway tracks with a train approaching, the hero riding hell-for-leather to get to her before the train did. Cliffhanger to ensure you returned the next week which, of course, we did.

Reading The Fifth To Die is like that. Don’t expect any resolution baby, because you ain’t gonna get it. You are going to be left teetering on the edge of a cliff, the ground crumbling beneath your feet as the villain races towards you from one direction intending to push you off, and the good guys race towards you from the opposite direction intent on sweeping you to safety. All you can do is stand there helplessly wondering who is going to get to you first. . . and let me assure you that, unlike the old serials, the outcome is not guaranteed!

But this is one hell of a ride. One that will leave you breathless, exhilarated, and screaming AAAAARRGH! when your heart is pounding, your blood racing, and the final sentence reads ‘To be concluded. . .’

Mr Barker? I hope you are writing fast. Because I want that next damned book. Now!

Warning – You really need to read The Fourth Monkey first.

Recommendation: read the author’s acknowledgements which includes, among other things of interest, this little gem ‘Finally, to Anson Bishop – are you ready to finish this little dance?’ I am glad I can’t see inside your head, Mr Barker, I imagine it to be a very scary place indeed.

Thank you to publishers Houghton Mifflin Harcourt via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of The Fifth To Die by J.D. Barker for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2375971853

I apologize for my absence yesterday. I have been battling a virus all week and yesterday it won! I spent the day sleeping and alternately sweating and being chilled. Not nice, but there is a lot of it around. I hope none of you fall ill with it. I feel like I have turned the corner today and am on the mend. Stay well and stay warm. Happy reading my friends

Sandy’s Sunday Summary

It is a bitterly cold and dismal Sunday here in the central North Island of New Zealand, with heavy rain forecast for this afternoon. A perfect day for reading in front of the fire!

Currently I am reading

Blood on the Tracks: Railway Mysteries

A collection of Golden Age detective fiction short stories, which I am really enjoying. I have discovered a few new authors to follow up.

I am listening to

Money in the Morgue: The New Inspector Alleyn Mystery

So you can see that, this weekend, I am firmly ensconced in the past.

For the coming week, I am planning on reading

The Fifth To Die (4MK Thriller, #2)

In the thrilling sequel to The Fourth Monkey, a new serial killer stalks the streets of Chicago, while Detective Porter delves deeper into the dark past of the Four Monkey Killer.

Detective Porter and the team have been pulled from the hunt for Anson Bishop, the Four Monkey Killer, by the feds. When the body of a young girl is found beneath the frozen waters of Jackson Park Lagoon, she is quickly identified as Ella Reynolds, missing three weeks. But how did she get there? The lagoon froze months earlier. More baffling? She’s found wearing the clothes of another girl, missing less than two days. While the detectives of Chicago Metro try to make sense of the quickly developing case, Porter secretly continues his pursuit of 4MK, knowing the best way to find Bishop is to track down his mother. When the captain finds out about Porter’s activities, he’s suspended, leaving his partners Clair and Nash to continue the search for the new killer alone.

Obsessed with catching Bishop, Porter follows a single grainy photograph from Chicago to the streets of New Orleans and stumbles into a world darker than he could have possibly imagined, where he quickly realizes that the only place more frightening than the mind of a serial killer is the mind of the mother from which he came.

Walk a Crooked Line (Jo Larsen, #2)

A young girl has taken her own life. But what—or who—drove her to it?

When a teenager’s body is found at the base of the old water tower, Detective Jo Larsen is one of the first on the scene. Tragically, it appears to be a clear case of suicide.

But the more Jo learns about Kelly Amster, the more she finds herself needing to understand why the high school sophomore would take that fatal plunge. As they interview family and friends, Jo and her partner, Hank Phelps, begin to fit together the pieces of a dark puzzle. Something happened to Kelly in their small town of Plainfield, Texas—and it sent the young girl straight over the edge.

Haunted by the memories of her own childhood, Jo digs deep into the shadowy corners of a seemingly tight-knit community—to uncover a devastating secret…

And, oh dear! Six ARCs from NetGalley this week, plus one directly from the author. From NetGalley

The Killing Type: A short story from the bestselling author of My Husband’s Wife

The Silent Sister

The Secret

For Better and Worse

My Real Name Is Hanna

And, finally . . .

Pieces of Her

The publishers have sent me this in epub, which I can’t read on my Kindle. There seems to be a number of different programs out there for converting epub to mobi. Any recommendations?

And Lynda Renham has sent me a copy of

Watching You

Which I am looking forward to.

Now it’s time to make a big pot of tea and get comfy in front of the fire with my book and a do not disturb sign. Happy reading my friends!

 

 

A Steep Price by Robert Dugoni

A Steep Price by Robert Dugoni
A Steep Price (Tracy Crosswhite, #6) 
by

Robert Dugoni (Goodreads Author)

Reviewed by

30817744


EXCERPT: The daylight had nearly extinguished, the forest now an ever-deepening gray. It was time to go home.

Something moved. She turned.

Something in the brush. She turned again, then a third time. Something circling her.

She turned yet again, but saw only the trees, straight and tall, like darkened sentries. She fought to hold her breath, struggling to listen. The crickets clicked and the unseen insects buzzed. A light breeze caught the limbs of the trees, causing them to moan and creak. A bullfrog croaked.

She took another deep breath, exhaled, and turned to leave.

ABOUT THIS BOOK: Called in to consult after a young woman disappears, Tracy Crosswhite has the uneasy feeling that this is no ordinary missing-persons case. When the body turns up in an abandoned well, Tracy’s suspicions are confirmed. Estranged from her family, the victim had balked at an arranged marriage and had planned to attend graduate school. But someone cut her dreams short.

Solving the mystery behind the murder isn’t Tracy’s only challenge. The detective is keeping a secret of her own: she’s pregnant. And now her biggest fear seems to be coming true when a new detective arrives to replace her. Meanwhile, Tracy’s colleague Vic Fazzio is about to take a fall after his investigation into the murder of a local community activist turns violent and leaves an invaluable witness dead.

Two careers are on the line. And when more deadly secrets emerge, jobs might not be the only things at risk.

MY THOUGHTS: 3.5 stars

For some reason A Steep Price failed to excite me like the other books in this series, which I have followed from the beginning, did.

Multiple Choice – pick one or more options from the following list –
(a) Lacks the action and suspense of previous books in the series.
(b) I’m tired, as is the series.
(c) Having alternating chapters, each dealing with one of the two cases, was distracting. Life doesn’t work like that. Usually things overlap and run into one another.
(d) There was something missing. The characters all felt flat. . .
(e) I don’t generally enjoy reading about drug running and gangs.

There are no wrong answers. All apply for me.

This should have worked for me. Dugoni makes a good job of misdirecting the reader. There is plenty of human interest in the plot, which is current and relevant. Strangely enough, I found the acknowledgements to be more interesting than the actual book. I enjoyed reading about how Dugoni had come to write this book after he had read separate articles about arranged marriages and sugar dating.

In retrospect, I think that this book would have benefited from Dugoni sticking to the one storyline within the plot and writing about it in more depth. The whole drug/gang scenario only served to muddy the waters and detract from what could have been an excellent story.

Thank you to Thomas and Mercer via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of A Steep Price by Robert Dugoni for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system.

This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2283386556

Sandy’s Sunday Summary

Is running a little late this week. .. my two hours at work turned into a full day as I had two staff call in sick 😩. By the time I shut the bar last night and came home, all I wanted was my dinner, a hot bath, and bed. I plan on only doing wages and banking today, then coming home. . .

Despite the long hours last week ,I actually managed to sneak in an extra book!

When Archie Met Rosie by Lynda Renham

Which was a delightful and amusing read. Watch for my review.

Currently I am reading

A Steep Price (Tracy Crosswhite, #6)

A series I have followed from the start.

And I am listening to

Accused (Rosato & DiNunzio, #1)

This week I am planning on reading

Homecomings

At the end of the row of fishermen’s cottages by the harbour’s edge, stands an old granite house.

First it belonged to Ned’s parents; then Ned dropped anchor here after a life at sea and called it home. His nephew Hugo moved in too, swapping London for the small Cornish fishing village where he’d spent so many happy holidays.

It’s a refuge – and now other friends and relations are being drawn to the the house by the sea.
Among them is Dossie, who’s lonely after her parents died and her son remarried. And cousin Jamie, who’s coming home after more than a year, since his career as an RAF pilot was abruptly cut short. Both have to adjust to a new way of life.

As newcomers arrive and old friends reunite, secrets are uncovered, relationships are forged and tested, and romance is kindled.

For those who come here find that the house by the harbour wall offers a warm welcome, and – despite its situation at the very end of the village – a new beginning…

Marcia Willett is an author I have enjoyed in the past, so I am looking forward to reading this.

Her Name Was Rose

Her name was Rose. You watched her die. And her death has created a vacancy. 

When Emily lets a stranger step out in front of her, she never imagines that split second will change her life. But after Emily watches a car plough into the young mother – killing her instantly – she finds herself unable to move on.

And then she makes a decision she can never take back.

Because Rose had everything Emily had ever dreamed of. A beautiful, loving family, a great job and a stunning home. And now Rose’s husband misses his wife, and their son needs a mother. Why couldn’t Emily fill that space?

But as Emily is about to discover, no one’s life is perfect … and not everything is as it seems.

Only one ARC from NetGalley this week

The Pupil: Some lessons are deadly - A gripping psychological thriller

and one directly from the author

Seventh (The Seventh Wave Book 1)

The sun is up on another Monday morning here in New Zealand after a cold, wet and windy Sunday. So I had better crack on with all the jobs I never got done over the weekend, and then head off to work again.

Wherever you are, whatever your weather, Happy reading my friends 😎

 

Sandy’s Sunday Summary

Right now, it seems as though we are having more than one Sunday a week. It can’t possibly be a week since I last wrote a summary post, yet my diary says it is. I can’t explain the phenomenon where, once we are more than a quarter into the year, time speeds up and continues to do so right through to Christmas. Can anyone out there explain?

Currently, I am not reading anything, having finished Bring Me Back

Last night before I went to sleep. This was my first read by B. A. Paris and I can certainly see why her books have such a great following! This was a one sitting read for me. Look for my review tomorrow.

This week I am planning on reading

The Date

Something bad has happened to Alison Taylor.

Her Saturday night started normally. Recently separated from her husband, Ali has been persuaded by her friends to go on a date with a new man. She is ready, she is nervous, she is excited. She is about to take a step into her new future.

By Sunday morning, Ali’s life is unrecognisable. She wakes, and she knows that something is wrong. She is home, she is alone, she is hurt and she has no memory of what happened to her.

Worse still, when she looks in the mirror, Ali doesn’t recognise the face staring back at her. She can’t recognise her friends and family. And she can’t recognise the person who is trying to destroy her…

I love this author and it has taken a great deal of self control, something that I am not known for possessing, not to move it up my list.

Also this week I plan to read

Missing Pieces

What if the one thing that kept you together was breaking you apart?

All Linda wants to do is sleep. She won’t look at her husband. She can’t stand her daughter. And she doesn’t want to have this baby. Having this baby means moving on, and she just wants to go back to before. Before their family was torn apart, before the blame was placed.

Alienated by their own guilt and struggling to cope, the Sadler family unravels. They grow up, grow apart, never talking about their terrible secret.

That is until Linda’s daughter finds out she’s pregnant. Before she brings another Sadler into the world, Bea needs to know what happened twenty-five years ago. What did they keep from her? What happened that couldn’t be fixed?

A devastating mistake, a lifetime of consequences. How can you repair something broken if pieces are missing?

Missing Pieces is Laura Pearson’s debut novel.

And I have more than made up for the lack of ARC approvals last week with five this week.

Not Her Daughter

Walk a Crooked Line (Jo Larsen, #2)

Winter Cottage

Her Mother's Grave (Detective Josie Quinn, #3)

Last Witness: A gripping crime thriller you won't be able to put down

I hope there are some titles amongst these that appeal to you as much as they appeal to me. I have to admit that it was the absolutely beautiful cover on Winter Cottage that caught my eye, but after reading the plot summary I simply had to request it!

There are two authors I have read before and really enjoy, Lisa Regan and Chris Merritt. If you haven’t read them, check them out next time you are looking for something to read. The other three authors are new to me.

Let me know what you are reading, what you think was great and what you didn’t like. We are in for a stormy afternoon, so I am going to settle in front of the fire with a pot of tea and my next read. Happy reading and enjoy the rest of your weekend.

 

 

The Killing Habit by Mark Billingham

The Killing Habit by Mark Billingham
The Killing Habit: A Tom Thorne Novel 
by

Reviewed by

30817744


EXCERPT: Tanner could only blink for a few seconds. The surge of adrenaline left her dry mouthed and dizzy as she wrestled with the picture, willing it to make sense. She knew exactly who he was, of course, but he should not have been here.

‘What are you —?’

Then she saw what was in the man’s hand and the moment of clarity punched through the roaring in her ears. Left only terror. She understood how stupid she had been – they had all been.

ABOUT THIS BOOK: From “one of the most consistently entertaining, insightful crime writers working today” (Gillian Flynn), The Killing Habit again brings together favorite wild-card detective Tom Thorne and straight-laced DI Nicola Tanner on a pair of lethally high-stakes cases.

While DI Nicola Tanner investigates the deadly spread of a dangerous new drug, Tom Thorne is handed a case that he doesn’t take too seriously, until a spate of animal killings points to the work of a serial killer. When the two cases come together in a way that neither could have foreseen, both Thorne and Tanner must risk everything to catch two very different killers.

MY THOUGHTS: Although I don’t like reading about either drugs or animal killings, and this book contains both (nothing graphic!), Billingham has managed to produce yet another 4.5-star read for me. 15 books into the D I Tom Thorne series, and my respect for both the series and the author continues to grow. It is no mean feat to continue to grow the characters and come up with fresh and interesting plots after so many books.

The series of cat killings mentioned in this book is based on a real and disturbing case that, at the time Billingham wrote The Killing Habit, remained unsolved. I sincerely hope that they have, by now, caught this maniac. If not, then the thought of what may lay ahead is chilling. . .

And this premise, that people who harm animals will go on to harm people, is the basis for Billingham’s The Killing Habit. But, as is usual with Billingham’s plots, nothing is quite that straight forward. There are plenty of loops, diversions, twists and turns to keep the thriller aficionado turning the pages, nicely balanced with snapshots of Thorne’s and Tanner’s private lives.

A very satisfying read, and I am already eagerly anticipating the next book in the series.

Thank you to Grove Atlantic via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of The Killing Habit by Mark Billingham for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system.

This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2375974579

Sandy’s Sunday Summary

Sunday, and it’s kind of living up to its name. The sun is intermittently peeking through the clouds, and it’s not raining! There is some actual warmth to the sun if you are out of the wind.

Isn’t it the truth that it’s not the length of a book that mostly determines how long it takes to read ,but your level of interest. I spent all week struggling through Night-Gaunts by Joyce Carol Oates which, to my great relief, I finished yesterday. I worked yesterday, last night and this morning, but already I am half way through my next read! I have to admit that I am enjoying

Deception Wears Many Faces

every bit as much as I enjoyed the first book I read by this author, His Kidnapper’s Shoes.

This week I am planning on reading

The Killing Habit: A Tom Thorne Novel

From “one of the most consistently entertaining, insightful crime writers working today” (Gillian Flynn), The Killing Habit again brings together favorite wild-card detective Tom Thorne and straight-laced DI Nicola Tanner on a pair of lethally high-stakes cases.

While DI Nicola Tanner investigates the deadly spread of a dangerous new drug, Tom Thorne is handed a case that he doesn’t take too seriously, until a spate of animal killings points to the work of a serial killer. When the two cases come together in a way that neither could have foreseen, both Thorne and Tanner must risk everything to catch two very different killers. Mark Billingham is one of my favorite authors.

Bring Me Back

Finn and Layla are young, in love, and on vacation. They’re driving along the highway when Finn decides to stop at a service station to use the restroom. He hops out of the car, locks the doors behind him, and goes inside. When he returns Layla is gone—never to be seen again. That is the story Finn told to the police. But it is not the whole story.

Ten years later Finn is engaged to Layla’s sister, Ellen. Their shared grief over what happened to Layla drew them close and now they intend to remain together. Still, there’s something about Ellen that Finn has never fully understood. His heart wants to believe that she is the one for him…even though a sixth sense tells him not to trust her.

Then, not long before he and Ellen are to be married, Finn gets a phone call. Someone from his past has seen Layla—hiding in plain sight. There are other odd occurrences: Long-lost items from Layla’s past that keep turning up around Finn and Ellen’s house. Emails from strangers who seem to know too much. Secret messages, clues, warnings. If Layla is alive—and on Finn’s trail—what does she want? And how much does she know?

A tour de force of psychological suspense, Bring Me Back will have you questioning everything and everyone until its stunning climax.

This will be my first encounter with this author about whom I have heard so much.

And I have a zero ARC week. I have requests pending . . .

Happy reading. Don’t be shy about telling me what you have read /are reading/ have lined up to read. I love a little book envy!

Happy reading!

Sandy’s Sunday Summary

Who put the world on fast forward ? Sunday again and I have read very little this week due to the craziness at work. One more week and hopefully things will start to settle down a little. There have been times this week when I have wondered if I have bitten off more than I can chew with this position, but really I think that’s just tiredness talking. I didn’t even manage to complete what I had planned on reading this week. I am only half way through

The Summer Children (The Collector, #3)

But  it is a really good read and as soon as I have finished posting today, I will be heading for my reading chair with a ‘do not disturb’ sign.

I am currently listening to

Then She Was Gone

I love this author, and the narrator is magnificent.

When  my Kindle is on the charger, I am reading the latest Stephen King, which I bought last week.

The Outsider

This week I am planning on reading

Night-Gaunts and Other Tales of Suspense

In the title story of her taut new fiction collection, Night-Gaunts and Other Tales of Suspense, Joyce Carol Oates writes: Life was not of the surface like the glossy skin of an apple, but deep inside the fruit where seeds are harbored. There is no writer more capable of picking out those seeds and exposing all their secret tastes and poisons than Oates herself―as brilliantly demonstrated in these six stories.

The book opens with a woman, naked except for her high-heeled shoes, seated in front of the window in an apartment she cannot, on her own, afford. In this exquisitely tense narrative reimagining of Edward Hopper’s Eleven A.M., 1926, the reader enters the minds of both the woman and her married lover, each consumed by alternating thoughts of disgust and arousal, as he rushes, amorously, murderously, to her door. In “The Long-Legged Girl,” an aging, jealous wife crafts an unusual game of Russian roulette involving a pair of Wedgewood teacups, a strong Bengal brew, and a lethal concoction of medicine. Who will drink from the wrong cup, the wife or the dance student she believes to be her husband’s latest conquest? In “The Sign of the Beast,” when a former Sunday school teacher’s corpse turns up, the blighted adolescent she had by turns petted and ridiculed confesses to her murder―but is he really responsible? Another young outsider, Horace Phineas Love, Jr., is haunted by apparitions at the very edge of the spectrum of visibility after the death of his tortured father in “Night-Gaunts,” a fantastic ode to H.P. Lovecraft.

Reveling in the uncanny and richly in conversation with other creative minds, Night-Gaunts and Other Tales of Suspense stands at the crossroads of sex, violence, and longing―and asks us to interrogate the intersection of these impulses within ourselves.

Deception Wears Many Faces

When Lyddie takes her sister to Devon to recover after a recent suicide attempt, it starts a train of events that will put their lives in grave danger.

Ellie has been the victim of a professional con artist, one who stole her savings, then disappeared from her life. Driven by her own history of failed relationships, Lyddie vows revenge on the man who broke her sister’s heart.

Soon she assumes a false identity and begins her hunt for a man she knows to be cold, calculating and ruthless. But who is fooling whom? And can Lyddie find the justice she seeks and heal her damaged sister?

I received only three ARCs this week

When Archie Met Rosie: An Unexpected Love Story

The Murder of My Aunt (British Library Crime Classics)

and Sins of the Fathers by Andrea Fraser, for which I don’t currently have a cover image.

So that’s my week all wrapped up, and next week’sreading mapped out ,but you know what they say about the best laid plans . . .

Happy reading my friends, and don’t forget to let me know what you are reading and what you think of it.

Cheers

Sandy

 

 

 

Dying Truth by Angela Marsons

Dying Truth by Angela Marsons
Dying Truth (D.I. Kim Stone, #8) 
by

Angela Marsons (Goodreads Author)

Reviewed by

30817744


EXCERPT: I lied.

I said yes.

How could I tell them how I really felt? How could I tell them that a piece of me dies every time I come home? How could I try and penetrate the perfect bubble around them? How could I reveal what I do to stay calm? How can I share the darkness that shadows every thought I have; the rage that heats my blood?

How could I tell them that I’m the broken child?

ABOUT THIS BOOK: How far would you go to protect your darkest secrets?

When teenager Sadie Winter jumps from the roof of her school, her death is ruled as suicide – a final devastating act from a troubled girl. But then the broken body of a young boy is discovered at the same school and it’s clear to Detective Kim Stone that these deaths are not tragic accidents.

As Kim and her team begin to unravel a dark web of secrets, one of the teachers could hold the key to the truth. Yet just as she is about to break her silence, she is found dead.

With more children’s lives at risk, Kim has to consider the unthinkable – whether a fellow pupil could be responsible for the murders. Investigating the psychology of children that kill brings the detective into contact with her former adversary, Dr Alex Thorne – the sociopath who has made it her life’s work to destroy Kim.

Desperate to catch the killer, Kim finds a link between the recent murders and an initiation prank that happened at the school decades earlier. But saving these innocent lives comes at a cost – and one of Kim’s own might pay the ultimate price.

MY THOUGHTS: Clear your diary! Angela Marsons has a new book in the D. I. Kim Stone series, and Dying Truth is a book that, once you start, you can’t put down. I took it to work. I read through morning tea, I read through lunch instead of taking advantage of the sunshine and going for a walk, I read through afternoon tea, and we had takeaways for dinner because I didn’t want to lose reading time by cooking! I finished Dying Truth before I went to sleep. This is the best of the series yet!

Marsons is an incredible writer. In Dying Truth she tackles the subjects of bullying and self-harm, all neatly tucked into the investigation of the apparent suicide of a young girl at an elite school. Heathcrest is a school that is a bastion of secrecy, lies, private elite clubs, privilege, wealth, and illegal abortions, and has been for generations. Here alliances are formed and relationships brokered that will last for lifetimes.

But secrets and lies have consequences, and someone has to pay the price. ..

D. I. Kim Stone has grown a lot in character in the previous seven books. She continues to do so in Dying Truth. But she still shuts herself off, to a certain degree, assuming guilt for every victim she can’t save, burying herself in responsibility, and the determination to right every wrong. ‘For as long as she could remember, her mind had been a series of boxes. Every one contained something that had the power to hurt her, to reach the depths of her soul and break her apart.’ She relaxes by rebuilding old motorbikes and walking her dog Barney.

And it is great to also see the growth of the supporting cast, Dawson and Stacey in particular. They have become characters in their own right.

I love Marsons turns of phrase. ..’He reminded her of an overfilled laundry basket at home, so full of items that it was misshapen, bulging. It was like he’d been stuffed to overflowing with good looks, a lean athletic body, excessive charm and charisma bursting out of his sixteen year old body. Once he emptied the basket and learned moderation, he’d be a dangerous individual.’

Where to next Angela Marsons? I long ago ran out of rating stars for your books – five stars just aren’t enough.

Thank you to Bookouture via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of Dying Breath by Angela Marsons for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system.

This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2375973864