Evil Crimes by Michael Hambling

Evil Crimes by Michael Hambling
Evil Crimes (DCI Sophie Allen #6) 
by Michael Hambling

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: . . . I think she’s convinced herself that there might be something wrong, and she wants to nip it in the bud before we have another death on our hands. If it is the same woman behind these two deaths, then she’s right to push hard. Killers can soon get addicted to what they do. The boss is worried that she might have already chosen another victim. If that’s the case, it’s a race and we’re handicapped because there’s so much we don’t yet know.

THE BLURB: A young man’s body is spotted in the stormy sea off Dancing Ledge in Dorset.

Did he lose his footing in the gale force winds and fall in? Or is there a more sinister cause of death?

Detective Sophie Allen’s team discover some curious links to a suicide that happened six months earlier.

A strikingly attractive female student connects the cases. Alarming facts slowly come to light as the team probes more deeply.

Is the young woman as evil as she seems or is someone else manipulating her?

DCI Sophie Allen races against time to uncover the tragic secrets behind the crimes and stop any more deaths.

MY THOUGHTS: How have I previously missed out on Michael Hambling? How many times have I said that I wished someone would give me a strong female lead detective who isn’t carrying loads of baggage and lives a relatively normal life? A female Alan Banks.

Well, here she is. DCI Sophie Allen is happily married to the father of her two daughters, one coming up eighteen, the other a little older. She has a great relationship with both her daughters and with her mother, who’s quite a colorful character. She works well with her team. A nice woman who gets the job done. A breath of fresh air!

And if you think that sounds boring, you’d be wrong. The characters are well portrayed, the plot unusual and interesting. I liked this so much that I am planning to gorge myself on the earlier books in the series over the Christmas break.

And, in case you are wondering, Evil Crimes works perfectly well as a stand alone.

Thank you to Joffe Books via Netgalley for providing me with a digital copy of Evil Crimes by Michael Hambling for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2203231397?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1

Chord of Evil by Sarah Rayne

Chord of Evil by Sarah Rayne
Chord of Evil (Phineas Fox #2) 
by Sarah Rayne

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: On the first night she knelt on the window-seat of her room, staring across the darkening landscape towards a huddle of buildings. At first she was not sure what they were. They were too large to be farm buildings, and too neatly laid out to be a village. She thought the word for it might be regimented. Might it be a factory? But as she went on looking, her eyes began to adjust to the darkness – or perhaps the moon simply came out from behind clouds – and she could make out tall gates. She was seeing more details as well now, and sick horror was starting to sweep over her. Because on the eastern side of the buildings, almost exactly as she had seen them in her nightmares, were jutting brick chimneys.

It’s a concentration camp, thought Christa. It’s one of the places where people are shut away and where the skewer-eyed men and the humpback surgeons pull out their bones. Where the brick chimneys sometimes glow with heat, because people – dozens of people – are being burned. For the first time since leaving Lindschoen, she was grateful that Stefan was not with them.

THE BLURB: A mysterious 1940s’ portrait leads researcher Phineas Fox to uncover a devastating wartime secret in this chilling novel of suspense.

Phineas Fox finds it impossible to refuse when his sport-loving neighbour Toby begs for his help in finding out what’s happened to his cousin Arabella, who seems to have disappeared without trace. The only clue to her whereabouts is an obscure 1940s’ portrait left in her flat, a gift from her godfather, Stefan. The painting depicts the mysterious Christa Klein, Stefan’s sister – and an alleged murderess.

Was Christa Klein really guilty of a monstrous crime? What exactly happened within brooding Wewelsburg Castle back in 1941? And what does it have to do with Arabella’s disappearance? As Phin delves further, he uncovers evidence of a lost piece of music and a devastating wartime secret: an atrocity whose repercussions reach to the present day.

MY THOUGHTS: I enjoyed Chord of Evil by Sarah Rayne, although I wouldn’t call it chilling. It is really almost a cosy mystery. Although some of the subject matter, the concentration camps, the Nazi’s treatment of the Jews, could be horrific, it is merely glossed over in favor of presenting a good mystery.

And it is a good mystery, one that had me turning the pages rapidly to find out who was going to survive and just whether or not Christa was a murderess.

Don’t expect any great historical depth, or in fact much depth at all. If you want a quick, enjoyable mystery to read, Chord of Evil fits the bill admirably. If I get the chance to read more in this series, I will definitely be taking it.

Thank you to Severn House via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of Chord of Evil by Sarah Rayne for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2202189458?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1

Dying Breath (Detective Lucy Harwin #2) by Helen Phifer

Dying Breath by Helen Phifer
Dying Breath (Detective Lucy Harwin, #2) 
by Helen Phifer (Goodreads Author)

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: Right there and then he’d known that he was different to most kids, probably most people. They were all scared of death and dead people, whereas he was fascinated with them and couldn’t get enough. He needed to see a real dead person – he wanted to see if they looked as beautiful as his girls had. He wanted to touch one, stroke their skin, run his fingers through their hair. He wouldn’t think twice about kissing one; he wanted to know what it would feel like to put his lips on theirs. He thought about Carrie. He would have kissed her.

THE BLURB: Take a breath. Pray it’s not your last.
Just a few months after a terrifying case that nearly took her life, Detective Lucy Harwin is back with her squad in the coastal town of Brooklyn Bay – and this time, she’s faced with a case more horrifying than anything she’s encountered.

Along with her partner, Detective Mattie Jackson, Lucy is investigating what appears to be a vicious but isolated murder; a woman found bludgeoned to death on a lonely patch of wasteland.

But when a second victim is discovered strangled in an alleyway, then a young family shot in their own home, Lucy and the team must face the unthinkable reality – a killer is walking the streets of their town.

While Lucy and the team try to find the link between these seemingly unconnected murders, they uncover a disturbing truth – these murders are replicating those carried out by infamous serial killers.

Lucy must get to the killer before he strikes again. But he’s got his sights on her, and is getting ever closer… Can she save herself, before she becomes the final piece in his twisted game?

MY THOUGHTS: There are some absolutely chilling moments in Dying Breath by Helen Phifer. “He turned to take one last look at the man who had changed from a monster into his hero, and he grinned at him.” is one of them. It may not seem like much on its own, but when read in context you will feel chills up your spine.

Dark and twisty, Dying Breath had me wondering just who this child had grown up to become, because we never knew his name. . .but we knew what he had become and his life ambition. There are several people he could be, all of whom have some type of fixation on Lucy.

Dying Breath is deliciously suspenseful. Highly recommended ☆☆☆☆

Thank you to Bookouture via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of Dying Breath by Helen Phifer for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2199969913

Friday Favorite – Old Friends and New Enemies by Owen Mullen (Charlie Cameron #2)

Looking for something to read over the weekend?

Nothing on your book radar that is screaming “read me!”?

Check out my Friday Favorite  – it may not be new, it may not even be by an author you have ever heard of, but it will be a book that has captured both my imagination and my heart.

We first met Charlie Cameron in  Games People Play, which featured in an earlier Friday Favorite blog. Old Friends and New Enemies, the second book in the Charlie Cameron series, is the third book by Scottish novelist Owen Mullen that I have featured on my blog, an honor so far only awarded to one other author, Susan Hill.

But I think that Owen Mullen has a spectacular writing style, and is a name you are going to be hearing a lot of in the future, right up there with Stuart MacBride and Val McDermid. Of the other two books by Mullen that I have featured, Games People Play was long-listed for Bloody Scotland McIlvanney Crime Book Of The Year 2017, and And So It Began, book #1 in the Delaney series, was awarded ⭐Star Pick from the Sunday Times Crime Club.

So, you see, you’re onto a good thing here . . .

Old Friends and New Enemies by Owen Mullen
Old Friends and New Enemies (Charlie Cameron, #2) 
by Owen Mullen (Goodreads Author)

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: They dragged him from the boot of the car, down an embankment to the shore; gagged, bound and blindfolded. His feet scraped grass and stones, a shoe came off and was left behind. At the jetty, Kevin Rafferty waited in the boat. In a long career of violent persuasion, this guy had been the hardest to break. But it wouldn’t last, when the blindfold came off he’d realise the loch was to be his grave.

THE BLURB: The body on the mortuary slab wasn’t who Glasgow PI Charlie Cameron was looking for.
But it wasn’t a stranger.
Suddenly, a routine missing persons investigation becomes a fight for survival. As Charlie is dragged deeper into Glasgow’s underbelly he goes up against notorious gangster Jimmy Rafferty and discovers what fear really is.
Rafferty is so ruthless even his own sons are terrified of him.
Now he wants Charlie to find something. And Jimmy Rafferty always gets what he wants.
There is only one problem… Charlie doesn’t know where it is.

MY THOUGHTS: Old Friends and New Enemies: A tense and gripping Scottish Crime Thriller – all true, but neither tense nor gripping does this book justice.

This book follows on from Games People Play and again we meet with Charlie Cameron, who specialises in locating missing people; Jackie, the Manager of New York Blues, Charlies ‘local’ for want of a better word; Pat Logue, Charlie’s sidekick and husband of the long-suffering Gail; and DS Andrew Geddes, sometimes friend of Charlie who has been known to push the limits on what he unofficially reveals to Charlie.

Charlie is looking for a man who went missing after his teenage son committed suicide. There is an unidentified body in the morgue who just may be the man Charlie is trying to locate. Instead he finds an old friend, Ian Selkirk, whom he hasn’t seen for years. Ian has been tortured. Whoever killed him wanted something. And now they think Charlie may have it……

I have never before read an author who can pack so much meaning and imagery into so few words. His writing style could almost be called terse. It is also refreshing, dynamic and (as I have said previously) totally unputdownable.

Gripping? Yes. Thrilling? Yes. But both these words pale in the face of Owen Mullen’s talent. Here is a new writer with a brilliant future.

Thank you to author Owen Mullen for a digital copy of this book in exchange for an honest and unbiased review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1575855828

 

 

Breaking Silence by Linda Castillo

(Kate Burkholder series #3)

Breaking Silence by Linda Castillo
Breaking Silence (Kate Burkholder, #3) 
by Linda Castillo (Goodreads Author)

30817744

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: Pickles was midway to his cruiser when his radio cracked to life. “What now?” he growled.

“Pickles, I got a ten-fifty-two out at the Slabaugh farm. David Troyer just called, said they got three people down in the manure pit.”

“Shit.” Pickles fumbled for his lapel mike. Back in the day, a cop had a radio in his cruiser. If he chose to ignore a call, he could. Now, you carried the damn thing around like some weird body part, one end clipped to your belt, one end stuck in your ear, and a microphone pinned to your chest like some damn medal. “You call EMS?”

“They’re en route. Thought you might want to get out there.”

Pickles heaved another sigh; he’d just about had all the mud and shit he could handle for one night. But he knew a manure pit could be a dangerous place. There were all sorts of nasty gases that would do you in faster than a gas chamber if you weren’t careful. “What’s the twenty on that?”

“Three six four Township Road Two.”

Pickles knew the area. It was a dirt track south of town that would be hell to traverse without a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Figuring this was the end of his Lucchese boots, he cursed. “You might want to call the chief.”

“Roger that.”

“I’m ten-seventy-six,” he said, and forced his old legs into a run.

THE BLURB: Police Chief Kate Burkholder is called to the scene of a horrific tragedy on a peaceful Amish farm.
The Slabaugh family are model Amish farmers, prosperous and hardworking, with four children and a happy extended family. When the parents and an uncle are found dead in their barn, it appears to be a gruesome accident: methane gas asphyxiation caused by a poorly ventilated cesspit. But in the course of a routine autopsy, the coroner discovers that one of the victims suffered a head wound before death—clearly, foul play was involved. But who would want to make orphans of the Slabaughs’ children? And is this murder somehow related to a recent string of shocking hate crimes against the Amish?

Having grown up Amish, Kate is determined to bring the killer to justice. Because the other series of attacks are designated hate crimes, the state sends in agent John Tomasetti, with whom Kate has a long and complex relationship. Together, they search for the link between the crimes—and uncover a dark secret at work beneath the placid surface of this idyllic Amish community.

MY THOUGHTS: I knew Castillo was good, but this is the best of the Kate Burkholder series yet. Breaking Silence is a real page turner.

There are multiple themes running through Breaking Silence, hate crimes, incest, psycological manipulation, bullying. There are no graphic descriptions, nothing to cause alarm for those for whom one or more of these subjects may be triggers. Everything is dealt with with a great deal of sensitivity. And yet Castillo still manages to deliver a riveting read.

I don’t even begin to understand those who commit hate crimes. What do the perpetrators hope to achieve? It seems to me to be a pointless waste of time on all fronts. I was no closer to understanding it at the end of the book.

The end of the book . . . Just when I thought everything was solved and sorted, Castillo turned in upside down and inside out, and we were off in pursuit of the criminal again. There are lots of twists and turns and plenty of action in this read. Highly recommended. ☆☆☆☆☆

I listened to the audio book version of Breaking Silence by Linda Castillo, narrated by Kathleen McInerney, published by MacMillan Audio via OverDrive. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1238890701

Jazz Funeral by Julie Smith

Jazz Funeral by Julie Smith
Jazz Funeral (Skip Langdon, #3) 
by Julie Smith (Goodreads Author)

30817744
Reviewed by


EXCERPT: “At $250 a pop,” fumed a red-faced man, “you’d think we’d at least get a drink.”

The shrill, uncertain buzz they’d noticed was developing a hysterical note. This was a party that wasn’t fun. Bemused, Skip and Steve worked their way back around to the front.

“Ham I could see,” said Skip. “He could have had to work late—it’s his busiest time. But where’s Ti-Belle?”

“Oh, ‘bout two houses away, I’d say. Approaching at a dead run, having just parked a Thunderbird with a squeal of wheels.”

Skip had heard the squeal, but had paid it no mind. Now she saw a very thin woman coming towards them, hair flying, long legs shining brown, sticking out from a white silk shorts suit. Over one shoulder she carried a lightweight flight bag. Golden-throated Ti-Belle Thiebaud, the fastest-rising star on the New Orleans music scene.

Steve said, “I’d know those legs anywhere.”

She never performed in any garment that wasn’t short, split, slit, or halfway missing. Some said the whole country would know those legs soon. They said she was going to be bigger than large, larger than huge.

Thiebaud was approaching at a dead trot, fast giving way to a gallop. She was wearing huge hoop earrings. She had giant black eyes and shining olive skin, flyaway blond hair that looked utterly smashing with her dark complexion. Her skin clung to her bones, hanging gently, as naturally as hide on a horse.

“How’d Ham get her?” she blurted.

A black man waved at the singer, tried to slow her progress, pretend it was a party: “Hey, Ti-Belle.”

Thiebaud paid him no mind but cast a look at the crowd in general. Skip saw twin wrinkles at the sides of her nose—one day they’d be there permanently if she worried a lot in the meantime.

“Hi, y’all.” She was trying to smile, but it wasn’t working. “Excuse me a minute.” She let herself in and closed the door behind her.

Almost immediately, a scream that could have come from anyone—the hottest Cajun R&B singer in America or any terrified woman—ripped through the nervous buzz.

THE BLURB: Smack in the middle of the summer, Skip finds herself investigating the stabbling death of the universally beloved producer of the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. Then the victim’s sixteen-year-old sister disappears, and Skip suspects that if the young woman isn’t herself the murderer, she’s in mortal danger from the person who is. And with her long-distance love, Steve Steinman, and her landlord, Jimmy Dee, to assist her, Skip trails an elusive killer through the delirium of a city caught up in the world’s most famous music bash….

MY THOUGHTS: 2 stars from me for Jazz Funeral by Julie Smith. This book really missed the mark with me, and was barely an okay read.

I love books set in the south. I have a fascination for New Orleans. And as y’all know I love a good murder-mystery/Detective story. But even with all these things going for it, Jazz Funeral failed to ignite my reading senses. At times, with its lack of atmosphere and lack of suspense,I considered dnf’ing it, and in retrospect, I should have. But I persevered as it did not take a great deal of effort or concentration to read. But then it gave about the same amount of satisfaction – not a great deal.

Yes,I know that this is #3 in a series of which I have not read the first two books. Would reading them have added to my enjoyment of Jazz Funeral? I think not. And no, I am not going to continue with the series.

The Kindle edition of Jazz Funeral I read was full of very basic typo errors which did nothing to endear it to me, and I really can’t recommend this read to anyone.

All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. Just because I didn’t enjoy this book, doesn’t mean that you won’t. If you enjoyed the excerpt above, and like the sound of the blurb, then go ahead and read Jazz Funeral. I enjoy the fact that we all have such diverse reading tastes.

Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2047340889

Friday Favorite – The Soul of Discretion by Susan Hill

Looking for something to read over the weekend?

Nothing on your book radar that is screaming “read me!”?

Check out my Friday Favorite  – it may not be new, it may not even be by an author you have ever heard of, but it will be a book that has captured both my imagination and my heart.

I started off by rereading the earlier books in the Simon Serrailler series, and then catching up on the latest book, The Soul of Discretion, which I read this week. WOW!!! I think my review says it all. ….

The Soul of Discretion by Susan Hill
The Soul of Discretion (Simon Serrailler, #8) 
by Susan Hill

30817744
Reviewed by


EXCERPT: He went through the gate and stopped. Later, he said that he would never forget the child’s face until his dying day. Later, he could not sleep because the face was in front of him. Later, he was haunted during his waking hours by sudden flashbacks to the child’s face as it looked up at him. . .

It was a girl. She was perhaps four years old. She was filthy, she had smears of blood on her arms and legs. Her long, fine, fair hair was matted to her scalp. She was completely naked.

THE BLURB: The cathedral town of Lafferton seems idyllic, but in many ways it is just like any other place. As part of the same rapidly changing world, it shares the same hopes and fears, and the same kinds of crime, as any number of towns up and down the land.

When one day DC Simon Serrailler is called in by Lafferton’s new Chief Constable, Kieron Bright, he is met by four plainclothes officers. He is asked to take the lead role in a complex, potentially dangerous undercover operation and must leave town immediately, without telling anyone – not even his girlfriend Rachel, who has only just moved in with him.

Meanwhile, Simon’s sister Cat is facing difficult choices at work that will test her dedication to the NHS. But an urgent call about her and Simon’s father, Richard, soon presents her with a far greater challenge much closer to home.

To complete his special op, Simon must inhabit the mind of the worst kind of criminal. As the op unfolds, Lafferton is dragged into the sort of case every town dreads. And Simon faces the fight of his life.

MY THOUGHTS: OMG!!!!! This is the most compelling, gut wrenching book I have read by this author.

Over the previous seven books in the Simon Serrailler series Susan Hill, while holding me spellbound with her writing and storytelling skills, has lulled me almost into a sense of complacency, of security. Then she goes and turns everything upside down and gives it a shake for good measure.

I am almost speechless. I never saw any of this coming. I read The Soul of Discretion in one sitting. And now, the next morning, I am still shell-shocked. Still reeling.

I have only one more thing to say. Susan Hill, I hope you are already hard at work on book #9. You can’t leave Simon there!

☆☆☆☆☆ bright, bouncy, shining stars for The Soul of Discretion by Susan Hill. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page

https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/1169832462?book_show_action=false&from_review_page=1

The Hanged Man by Simon Kernick

The Hanged Man by Simon Kernick
The Hanged Man (The Bone Field #2) 
by Simon Kernick (Goodreads Author)

30817744

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: Picture the scene. You’re at an isolated farm in the middle of the Welsh countryside. You know a young woman has been taken there by men who are going to rape and kill her. You’re certain you know who these men are. You’re also certain that they’ve killed women like this before a number of times, and yet you have no real evidence against them.

In one of the farm’s outhouses you discover huge vats of acid that will be used to dissolve her body when they’ve finished with her, just as they’ve dissolved the bodies of others. You investigate further and discover a windowless cellar with occult signs on the walls that you’ve seen at other crime scenes associated with these men.

Like a modern day night in shining armour, you rescue the young woman in a blaze of glory, arrest the perpetrators, and now, thanks to your detective work and personal bravery, you have enough evidence to put them away for mass murder for the rest of their miserable lives.

End of story.

Except, of course, that wasn’t how it happened.

THE BLURB: A house deep in the countryside where the remains of seven unidentified women have just been discovered.

A cop ready to risk everything in the hunt for their killers.

A man who has seen the murders and is now on the run in fear of his life.

So begins the race to track down this witness before the killers do.

For Ray Mason and PI Tina Boyd, the road ahead is a dangerous one, with bodies and betrayal at every turn…

MY THOUGHTS: This is a crime thriller. It contains a lot of shooting. And fighting. Action man stuff. Not usually my forte. I usually prefer something a little more subtle. But I couldn’t have not finished Simon Kernick’s The Hanged Man had you paid me.

However, I do recommend that you read #1 in the series, Bone Field, before you embark on The Hanged Man. It will answer a lot of questions, fill in the blanks. I didn’t. I am reading them in the wrong order, but read Bone Field I must.

Thank you Mr Kernick for an unexpectedly good read. I am sure that my husband will enjoy it immensely. After he has read Bone Field.

Thank you to Random House UK, Cornerstone via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of The Hanged Man by Simon Kernick for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on Goodreads.com https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34322571-the-hanged-man

Shadows on the Street by Susan Hill

The Shadows in the Street by Susan Hill
The Shadows in the Street (Simon Serrailler, #5) 
by Susan Hill

30817744

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: They could never quite decide if he was OK or not. He wasn’t weird. He wasn’t anything. All the same. . .

‘Say what you like,’ Hayley had said, ‘not normal.’

Only he seemed normal, watching them eat the sandwiches he’d made for them, pocket the chocolate bars he’d bought out of his own money, finish off the hot tea or coffee. He had a normal coat, normal blue wool scarf. Normal black shoes. Normal. He was clean, he shaved, he hadn’t got anything special about him or anything peculiar either. Just normal.

Only not.

THE BLURB: Simon Serrailler is on sabbatical on a Scottish island, recovering from an exhausting murder investigation, when he is urgently summoned back to Lafferton. Two local prostitutes have been found strangled. By the time Serrailer has reached the town, another girl has vanished. Is this a vendetta against prostitutes by someone with a warped mind? Or a series of killings by an angry punter? Then the wife of the new Dean at the Cathedral goes missing – has the killer widened their net or is there more than one murderer at large?

MY THOUGHTS: Susan Hill’s Simon Serrailler series is one of my favorite series, for many reasons. It is about so much more than a detective. It encompasses the story of a family, three generations of it, their struggles with their lives, their jobs, and each other. Disappointments, expectations, petty jealousies, health problems, deaths, remarriage, and the joys and problems of raising families. Moral dilemmas. Faith. Loss. Love. Grief. Adjustment. Belonging, or being on the outside looking in.

But there is always a crime to solve, and nothing is ever straightforward. Simon Serrailler, DCI, artist, loner, does not always feature hugely in the plot, but is a presence all the same. In the Shadows in the Street, he doesn’t feature in his police role until quite well into the book. And yet this doesn’t detract from the story at all, instead we get to see a side of Simon rarely shown to us, the recluse, the loner, the artist very much at home on a remote island.

There is always so much more to her books than is at first apparent. And discovering the hidden depths is always a pleasure for me.

A very fond ☆☆☆☆☆ for The Shadows in the Street by Susan Hill, published by Chatto and Windus, a division of Random House. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/963823954

Dying Day by Stephen Edger

Dying Day by Stephen Edger
Dying Day: Absolutely gripping serial killer fiction 
by Stephen Edger (Goodreads Author)

30817744

Reviewed by


EXCERPT: He pulled back the sheet and for a few cold heartbeats Kate was back in the South London mortuary, and she was staring down at the body of Amy Spencer. She shook her head, and the new victim’s face returned to the table. The pale skin clung to the slender frame, save for the patches of yellow and purple bruising around her torso. She couldn’t have been much older than twenty-two; such a tragic waste of life.

THE BLURB: Her dark skin looks almost grey; the effect of the elements and death’s touch. Her limp body left pressed against a wire fence like trash. I make a silent promise that I will do everything I can to catch the person who did this to her…

Exactly a year ago, Amy, a young detective on Detective Kate Matthews’ team, was killed when she was sent undercover to catch a serial killer targeting young girls.

Kate never forgave herself for letting the killer slip through her fingers…

As the case is reopened and the campaign to find the culprit begins again, Kate is told to stay well away, and for good reason: another girl’s body has been found.

Kate is determined to connect new evidence to the old to catch this monster before more innocent lives are taken. The trail runs cold when her prime suspect is found dead. But then why is the body count still rising?

The answer is more terrible than Kate could possibly have imagined, and the killer so much closer than she thinks…

MY THOUGHTS: I read Dying Day by Stephen Edger basically in one sitting.

This is a great example of the British crime genre.

The story is told over two timelines and points of view. Amy’s starts prior to her death, twelve months earlier, and counts down towards the event. Kate’s story is in the present, twelve months after Amy’s death, which she is haunted by, her guilt a driving force and coloring all her decisions.

Kate is a very strong character, following her own path irrespective of the restrictions placed upon her by her superiors. But it seems that no matter what she does, the solution to the riddle of Amy’s death remains just out of reach.

Dying Day is full of twists and turns, and although I had my suspicions as to the identity of Amy’s killer, I had no idea of the motive nor the means, and my suspicions were not confirmed until right at the end.

Fast paced and action filled, Dying Day is a solid ☆☆☆☆ read.

Thank you to Bookouture via Netgalley for providing a digital copy of Dying Day by Stephen Edger for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own. Please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the ‘about’ page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com for an explanation of my rating system. This review and others are also published on my Goodreads.com page https://www.goodreads.com/review/show/2183060753